ZQuiet Anti-Snoring Mouthpiece Reviews

Do you snore? Does your partner? The causes of snoring vary; you might snore occasionally, due to a cold or allergies. Or you may snore every night due to a health problem like sleep apnea or a deviated septum. If you’re overweight, a smoker, drink alcohol in the evening, or love to sleep on your back, your snoring can be room-shaking.

Snoring is very common and can be a source of friction between couples, but it also affects the quality of the snorer’s sleep and possibly their health. If you can find something that helps you snore less, you’ll probably feel more alert and rested. 

There are many products on the market that claim to reduce or prevent snoring. In this article, we’ll review one of one of these devices — the ZQuiet mouthpiece — to see if this anti-snoring device can help you get better sleep.

The ZQuiet Anti-Snoring Mouthpiece 

Regardless of the reason you snore, the mechanics are generally the same: while you sleep, your tongue and soft tissues in your mouth and throat relax. They can partially block your airway, narrowing it and making it more difficult to breathe. When you try to breathe through a narrower airway, the passing air makes the soft tissue vibrate and causes the snoring sound. 

The ZQuiet anti-snoring mouthpiece addresses the conditions that create snoring by bringing your jaw forward a few millimeters, which keeps your tongue from moving back to block your throat. This means you get more air easily, which quiets or resolves snoring issues. This type of device is known as a mandibular advancement device (MAD).

To be clear, a MAD isn’t the same as a Tongue Stabilizing Device (TSD), a dental mouthguard sometimes fitted for sleep apnea patients. A TSD is more like a splint for the tongue — it holds the tip of your tongue in place so it can’t slip to the back of the throat. The ZQuiet and other MADs fit more like an athletic mouthguard, between your teeth. 

Wearing the ZQuiet Device

You can use the ZQuiet mouthpiece the day you receive it because you don’t need to mold it to your mouth. Some mouthpieces use boil and bite fitting, but ZQuiet fits almost everyone. It’s thin and flexible with a cushioned design and is hinged so your jaw can move. This means your mouth can open and you can breathe, even if you have a stuffy nose. 

Some users describe feelings of panic when wearing a rigid mouthpiece, but ZQuiet’s malleable design gives you a springy, elastic feel. You can even grab a drink of water without removing it if you get thirsty in the night. 

ZQuiet Design and Construction

Made in the USA from medical-grade materials, the ZQuiet mouthpiece is BPA and latex-free. It’s approved by the FDA and was designed by dentists using methods they use to fit custom dental appliances. Unlike some anti-snoring mouthpieces, it does not need dental appointments for fittings and adjustments, saving you time and money. 

Many dentists recommend ZQuiet to their patients when asked about snoring. With no prescription necessary, it is easily available to anyone online.

ZQuiet Mouthpiece Sizes

When you order ZQuiet, you receive two mouthpieces in two sizes — a feature customers love. Comfort Size 1 moves your jaw just 2mm while Size 2 moves it 6mm. This way, you can customize your experience based on how serious your snoring is and how the mouthpiece feels for you. 

If Size 1 doesn’t stop your snoring, try Size 2. If Size 2 doesn’t feel good, you can wear Size 1. And if you and your partner annoy each other with snoring, you might each be able to use one device, making it very cost-effective.

Problems With the ZQuiet Mouthpiece

There is an adjustment period with MAD mouthpieces, and ZQuiet is no different. Your jaw or teeth may ache for a while as you get used to using it. This varies from person to person. Many customers say the first week or two is the most difficult. 

Some customers report adjusting well and finding the ZQuiet very comfortable after a few days, but some can’t get used to it and report feeling like their teeth have shifted or note that they experienced extreme jaw pain.

Another negative some users report is drooling so much that their pillow is wet. When they take the device out in the morning, they’re disgusted by the amount of saliva that has gathered in their mouth. While this may not be a dealbreaker, it’s something you may want to consider before buying.

Who Can Use ZQuiet?

Although designed to work for everyone, the ZQuiet may not be appropriate for all snorers. It would be more accurate to say the ZQuiet is designed to work for nearly everyone, as there are some people that cannot use ZQuiet. 

The box states: “Do not use ZQuiet if you have central sleep apnea, severe respiratory disease, temporomandibular disorder (TMJ), loose teeth, orthodontics, full dentures, or are under 18 years old.” 

If you have health problems, like sleep apnea or severe respiratory disease, seek advice from your doctor before trying a MAD like ZQuiet. Depending on your particular circumstances, you may need to use CPAP, APAP, or BiPAP devices which may not be compatible with a MAD. Some doctors recommend MADs in addition to these respiratory assistance devices on a case-by-case basis.

Finally, if you wear dentures or have other dental issues, ask your dentist’s advice on what could help you with snoring. 

ZQuiet Reviews

Many people report that ZQuiet works perfectly for them. They describe feeling better physically as their quality of sleep improves. The reviews from partners of snorers are even better. They love being able to sleep peacefully all night and note that they, too, feel more awake, refreshed, and happier with their partner.

The ZQuiet has a great reputation. However, there seems to be a subset of folks that find it uncomfortable. The shape of the jaw and bite alignment make a difference in how each person tolerates it. There isn’t really a way to tell which camp you fall into without trying it out. 

Luckily, ZQuiet offers a 60-day money-back guarantee if you’re unhappy with your results. You don’t get back the shipping and processing fees, but you won’t get stuck with something you can’t use. You may find it a small price to pay to see if it helps your snoring.

The ZQuiet Mouthpiece was designed by a dentist to help people stop snoring. This ingenious device moves your lower jaw a few millimeters forward. The repositioning of your jaw keeps the bottom of your tongue from obstructing your airway while you sleep. The ZQuiet slogan is, “Pop it in and the noise is gone.” With this innovative mouthpiece, it may be just that easy.

This state-of-the-art mandibular advancement device (MAD) is made of thin and flexible materials. The hinged design makes it one of the most functional anti-snoring treatments on the market. If you want to stop snoring for once and for all, this innovative tool might be right for you.

How does it work?

When the airways in your throat are blocked, the soft tissue vibrates and makes snoring noises. The ZQuiet device moves your lower jaw or mandible a few millimeters forward. That, in turn, eliminates obstructions in the airway. The result is clear, quiet and unobstructed breathing.

Advantages

There are many MADs on the market to treat snoring. However, the ZQuiet device boasts unique features for increased effectiveness and ease of use. This device is also more comfortable to wear and a better value overall than comparable generic mouthpieces. Here are just a few of the benefits:

  • A hinged design and springy materials make this device easy to wear and effective at removing airway blockages. The comfortable fit allows free breathing. Other anti-snoring devices keep your jaw clenched. If you can’t breathe through your mouth, you might panic. ZQuiet’s patented “living hinge” design lets you breathe with ease, open and close your mouth and even enjoy a beverage.
  • ZQuiet is safe, long-lasting and FDA-approved. It’s made entirely of BPA-free thermoplastic elastomers. Unlike other devices that are bulky and uncomfortable, ZQuiet is thin, flexible and lightweight.
  • The boil-and-bite mouthpieces currently available require molding and adjustments before you can use them. ZQuiet works immediately, and the device fits nearly everyone. Pop it in, and you can get positive results the first night.
  • ZQuiet has two separate mouthpieces. Type A is the starter mouthpiece. It delivers less jaw advancement, and you can use it right away. If you don’t get results from the Type A design, the Type B device will give you more jaw advancement and more space in the airways. The SnoreLab app can tell you which device works best for you.
  • With ZQuiet, you can breathe through your mouth. Even if your nose is blocked, it won’t interfere with your breathing.
  • The ZQuiet mouthpiece effectively eliminates snoring for the majority of people who try it. That includes people who have been treated with continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP).

SnoreLab findings confirm that ZQuiet delivers better results than most other breathing mouthpieces. Two different sizes make this product versatile enough to help most snoring individuals to experience greater comfort and easier breathing. However, if you wear dentures, please review the FAQs.

What causes Snoring?

Forty percent of men snore, and 20 percent of women snore. That works out to over 2 billion snoring individuals worldwide. Most of us don’t pay much attention to snoring unless we have a snoring bed partner. However, snoring can have adverse mental, emotional, social and physical effects on those who suffer from it.

Snoring is caused by a partial obstruction of the airways that makes the soft tissue in the throat vibrate. Most people snore at some point in their lives. It can happen to anyone at any time.

When the soft palate and other soft tissues in the upper airway vibrate, the noise they make is called snoring. These vibrating tissues can include the tonsils, adenoids, uvula and turbinates. When air is restricted from free movement through your airway, the soft tissues will flap and produce the customary snoring noise.

What is Sleep Apnea

Apnea is defined as a “temporary cessation of breathing, especially during sleep.” Apnea is a potentially dangerous condition whereby your airway closes periodically during sleep. This closing of the airway deprives you of needed oxygen until you wake up gasping for breath. Sleep apnea sufferers may need a device like a CPaP machine for more serious cases.

The most common symptom of apnea is loud snoring. Although not everyone with loud snoring has apnea, noisy snoring can put you at risk for apnea in the future. If you think you might have a problem with apnea, it’s best to address it now. Here are some questions to ask yourself or your partner if you think you might have apnea:

  • Do you alternate loud snoring with quiet breathing or with choking and gasping?
  • Do you wake up with a headache or a sore throat?
  • Are you excessively sleepy by day?
  • Are you experiencing mood swings or changes in your behavior
  • Is it difficult to concentrate?

There are two types of apnea: obstructive apnea and central apnea. The latter is caused by a disorder of the brain’s regulation of the breathing process. Central apnea is not related to snoring.

What makes Apnea Different from Snoring?

If you are snoring, you are breathing. Snoring tells you that air is passing through your airways and into your lungs. Snoring is a noisy way to breathe, but it still counts as breathing.

When snoring suddenly stops, it usually means the person who was snoring has now transitioned into obstructive apnea. Blood oxygen drops, carbon dioxide rises and your brain rouses you awake with a snort or a gasp for breath. Neck muscles open and relax so that air can pass easily into the lungs.

This process repeats itself when you go back to sleep and can continue nonstop throughout the night. For anyone suffering with apnea, it’s not uncommon to wake up feeling exhausted. People who have apnea who use the ZQuiet mouthpiece report deeper and more satisfying sleep. They also feel more refreshed and rested during the day.

Apnea is a serious condition that can have profound effects on your well-being. Although 95 percent of people with this condition snore, not everyone who snores has this condition. Nonetheless, obstructions that cause snoring can, over time, cause apnea as well. In fact, some doctors consider snoring to be the first stage of this disorder.